10 Most Favorite Books

We are well into the New Year and I thought it might be fun to share my 10 most favorite books with you, in case you are looking for something new to read.  I hope you find a book from the list that you love as much as I did.

Let’s get to it,

  1. Flying South, A Pilot’s Inner Journey by Barbara Cushman Rowell

A true story written by the wife of famed photographer Galen Rowell.  Barbara writes of her adventure of flying solo through South America.  She battles her fear, inner demons, injury and storms, but is determined to complete the journey and realize her dream.  Along the way she finds peace and strength.  The photography is stunning and her experience inspiring.  I’m sorry to say this one is out of print, but can be purchased from third party seller’s on Amazon. Sadly, Barbara and her husband perished in 2002 while flying to their home in Bishop, California.  Their lives are inspiring, they lived fully.

  1. A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

Ove, a cantankerous old man, and the neighborhood grouch.  But under his tough shell is a lonely man who has lost his wife.  Ove wants to die so he can be with his wife again.  When new neighbors move in and push their way into Ove’s life, they break through his tough shell, giving Ove a new purpose in life.

  1. A Year on Ladybug Farm Series by Donna Ball

Three women are ready to start a new chapter in their lives.  Close friends whose children have grown and moved on to their own lives, husbands who have died or left and they are itching for something new.  While traveling they find a crumbling old mansion, buy it, sell their homes and move.  The story is of friendship, overcoming difficulties and finding new challenges, joy and love along the way.  These books are hilarious and will have you laughing and crying.  They suffer one disaster after another, but are not deterred.  You will wish you could join them on their front porch with a glass of wine, they are just so much fun.

  1. The Chaperone by Laura Moriarty

The story of a woman, Cora leaves her home in Wichita, Kansas to accompany a minor, Louise Brooks to New York.  Louise is to spend 5 weeks at the prestigious Denishaw School of Dance and Cora has her own reasons for making the trip. In the short time they are in New York, both women’s lives will be transformed.  Louise Brooks was a silent film star and learning about her through the book was fascinating.

  1. The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom

Frankie Presto is an orphan being raised by a blind musician.  Frankie is given magic guitar strings that he takes with him to his new life.  He will become the greatest guitar player of all time.  The story spans Frankie’s life and Mitch weaves a tale of mystery, surprise, beauty and music.  You will be surprised at every turn.  Frankie will play with famous musicians and discover truths of his life you won’t see coming.

  1. Telling the Bees by Peggy Hesketh

A murder has occurred, but who committed the crime?  Who would murder 2 elderly women who stay to themselves and sell their honey from the front porch?  This beautifully researched and written novel is creative and one you can’t put down. It has an air of mystery, but also a very heartfelt story of friendship, lost love and the joys of bee keeping.  If you listen to the bees, you will learn some valuable life lessons.

  1. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Annie Barrows and Mary Ann Shafer

Set during the war.  The Germans are occupying Guernsey, a small island off the coast of England.  The society is born in a split second when a group is discovered and confronted by German soldiers while breaking curfew.  The story of this book club is so creatively told through a series of letters.

  1. Women of the Silk by Gail Tsukiyama

China, in 1926, 8 year old Pei is abandoned by her father.  Taken to work in the silk factories in China.  This book covers 20 years of Pei’s life, working in the silk factories.  Pei grows up, deals with abandonment and struggles to create a family for herself.

  1. The Language of Threads by Gail Tsukiyama

The follow on to Women of the Silk.  This second book picks up where the first one left off.  Pei is having to flee China, war is upon them and she leaves for Hong Kong to escape the tragedies of war.  Pei is once again faced with hardships as she is forced to start a new life.  Have this one on hand, downloaded to your e-reader so it is ready to open when you finish Women of the Silk, both are can’t put down novels.

  1. The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

Two sisters are separated by war, they are on completely different paths in life, but both are forced to face the horrors of war.  This novel really tells the story of the women in war, you see their point of view and realize how strong these women were.  The story is heartbreaking, break out the Kleenex, but is a must read. Kristin Hannah is one of my favorite authors.  She writes so vividly and her books are impossible to put down.

If you have a favorite or several, please share.  I am always looking for great books to add to my reading list.

Until next time,

Bee Readin’
Terri

 

Comments

  1. I absolutely loved “A Man Called Ove”, but have also enjoyed Fredrik Backman’s other two novels. His “My Grandmother Sends her Regards and Apologies” is a gem. I mostly read non-fiction, but a friend, whose reading taste is similar to mine, recently recommended “The Hate U Give” by Angie Thomas, which I bought, but haven’t started to read yet. I will definitely place some of your other recommendations on my “to read list”, Terry.

    • Terri

      Jolandi, I am so thrilled you loved A Man Called Ove. I too love Fredrik Backman’s books and have read them all. Let me know if you read any of the others on the list and what you think. I will have to check out The Hate U Give, thank you for letting me know about it. Loved your blog post today!

  2. Thank you for all of these great recommendations. I have added a few to my reading list. Last year I read, “A Man Called Ove.” I liked it better after I had time to digest and think about it. I may look into reading the book Jolandi (who left a comment above) talked about: “My Grandmother Sends…”

    • Terri

      Janet, you are most welcome. I’m glad you liked A Man Called Ove, and I understand it must be digested. The book that Jolandi recommended is titled in the U.S, My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry. I did review it and you can find the review on the blog. It started out not my favorite, but I stuck with it and waded through a bit of the imaginary world the grandmother creates for her granddaughter. Once the book came together, it was another one that needed to be digested, but I loved it. If you read it, please let me know what you think.

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